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Job-Seeking Course Part 1: Etiquette

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Job-Seeking Course Part 1: Etiquette
Job-Seeking Course Part 1: Etiquette
Part1

As job seekers, you will be considered the newest members of Japanese society, and must follow etiquette that reflects this. You don’t need to worry too much about keigo (honorifics) as even Japanese speakers make mistakes, but you will be expected to speak in a different way than you did during your days on the JET Programme. Here are some expressions you’ll need to remember.

Phoning a Company
Changing the date(s) on which you will attend an information session

You
「私、JETプログラム参加者の○○と申します。恐れ入りますが、人事部採用課の○○さまをお願いできますでしょうか」
Hello, my name is ~~ and I’m a member of the JET Programme. I’m sorry to trouble you, but is ~~in the employment section of the human resources department available?

Note: If the company is unfamiliar with the JET Programme, give them information about yourself that will help them understand who you are, such as ○○職に応募している/~~-shoku ni oubo shite iru (I am applying for the ~~ job) or ○○日に説明会の予約をしている/~~-nichi ni setsumeikai no yoyaku o shite iru (I have a reservation for the information session on the ~~th).

Human resources manager
(picks up the phone) 「はい、○○ですが…」
Hello, this is ~~.

You
「お忙しいところ、恐れ入ります。私、JETプログラム参加者の○○と申します。本日、メールにてご連絡いただきました会社説明会への参加日程なのですが、申しわけございませんが、当日は○○が重なっております。差しつかえなければ、参加日程を変更させていただくことはできませんでしょうか?」
Thank you for taking the time to talk to me. My name is ~~ and I’m a member of the JET Programme. I received your e-mail with the date of your company’s information session and I’m sorry but I will be busy with ~~ on that day. Is there any chance that I could attend on a different day?

Human resources manager
「わかりました。それでは○○日の○○時からではいかがですか?」
I see. How about ~~ o’clock on the ~~th, then?

You
「はい、○○日の○○時からですね。その日程でお願いいたします」
~~ o’clock on the ~~th will be fine. I’ll attend at that time.

Human resources manager
「では、○○日にお待ちしております」
In that case, we’ll see you on the ~~th.

You
「ありがとうございます。本日はお手数をおかけしまして、申しわけありませんでした。それでは、失礼いたします」
Thank you. I apologize for taking up your time today. Goodbye.

Explaining that you will be late

As a rule, you should avoid being late if at all possible. In situations such as a train delay, contact the company as soon as possible and apologize properly.

You
「私、JETプログラム参加者の○○と申します。恐れ入りますが、人事部採用課の○○さまをお願いできますでしょうか」
Hello, my name is ~~ and I’m a member of the JET Programme. I’m sorry to trouble you, but is ~~ in the employment section of the human resources department available?

Human resources manager
(picks up the phone) 「はい、○○ですが…」
Hello, this is ~~.

You
「お忙しいところ、恐れ入ります。私、JETプログラム参加者の○○と申します。本日、○○時にお伺いするお約束をいただいておりましたが、御社に向かう途中で○○が発生いたしました。(路線の事故等理由を伝えましょう)現在、向かっておりますが、定刻より○○分ほど遅れる見込みです。たいへん申しわけございませんが、ご了承いただきたくご連絡させていただきました」
Thank you for taking the time to talk to me. My name is ~~ and I’m a member of the JET Programme. I was supposed to visit your company at ~~ o’clock, but ~~ (an accident on the tracks, etc.) happened. I’m on my way now, but the train is expected to be around ~~ minutes late. I just wanted to let you know the situation and ask for your understanding. I’m very sorry for this inconvenience.

Human resources manager
「それはたいへんですね。了解いたしました。お待ちしておりますので、気をつけてお越しください」
I’m sorry to hear that. I understand. We’ll see you then, please take care.

You
「はい、ありがとうございます。ご迷惑をおかけしまして、申しわけありませんでした。さっそく、向かわせていただきます。失礼いたします。」
Thank you, I will. I’m sorry for the trouble. I’ll be there soon. Goodbye.

E-mailing a Company
Thank-you e-mail after an interview

(1) Write a subject that is brief and clearly conveys the matter at hand.
(2) Always state your name before getting to the main point*.
(3) Start by summing up what you will talk about in the e-mail.
(4) Add specific details, such as parts of the interview or items in the information session that you found particularly memorable.
(5) Finish with a signature including your name, e-mail address, phone number, etc. and mentioning that you are a member of the JET Programme.

*Note: If the company is unfamiliar with the JET Programme, give them information about yourself that will help them understand who you are, such as the job you are applying for or the fact that you plan to attend an information session on a particular date.

Sending Documents
Example cover letter

(1) Always include a cover letter on paper the same size or smaller than the documents you are sending.
(2) Hand-sign the cover letter even if you print the rest of it from a computer.
(3) Write 拝啓 (haikei, the standard starting phrase for Japanese letters) at the beginning and 敬具 (keigu, the standard sign-off) at the end.

Example address on the envelope

(1) Attach the stamp so that it lines up with the boxes where the postcode is written.
(2) Write the address, company name and department name from the same height on the envelope so that it looks neat.
(3) Add 御中 (onchuu, the standard honorific for addresses) after the department name.
(4) Write 応募書類在中 (oubo shorui zaichuu, ‘contains application documents’) in red and draw a box around it.
(5) Use an envelope that will fit your application form without folding it.

Example back of envelope

(1) Seal the flap with glue and write ‘〆’ or ‘封’ (both characters mean ‘sealed’).
(2) If sending by post, write the posting date with the numbers in kanji.
(3) Including your address in full gives a more professional impression.

©Mynavi Corporation, 2018. From a feature for international students from overseas/support materials for job seekers.

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Copyright 2015 by the Council of Local Authorities for International Relations (CLAIR)